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Eyes Up Hands Up

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“Eyes Up, Hands-Up” is a great action- packed game that involves plenty of throwing and catching skills as well as teamwork!
The objective of this game is to get as many balls in the barrel as you can before the time limit is up.

 

CLASS SET-UP
Please set-up the game as seen in the diagram. Please note that this game does take a bit of time to set-up. The teacher can do the set-up for this while students are engaged in an opening “instant activity.”

HOW TO PLAY
The students are divided into two teams. On the teacher’s signal, the students start throwing the balls to get them to land in other team’s barrels during a 2-minute round. Other rules include:

  • Once the balls are inside a barrel, they may NOT be taken out.
  • Students must stay on their own side of the playing area when throwing a ball.
  • However, they may cross the Center Line if they decide it is safe to retrieve a loose ball.
  • Each team may assign up to several “defenders” who will stand 3-4 feet in front of the team’s barrel. Have a designated “restraining line” if needed so the defenders don’t get too close to the barrel.
  • Students crossing the Center Line may be tagged by players on the other team.
  • When a student is tagged, he must leave the ball on the ground and return to his side of the playing area.
  • Optional: If your older students are tagged, they must go to the designated “Holding Zone” area as seen in the dia- gram (hula hoops). If one of the tagged players is able to catch a ball thrown by a teammate, all of the students are free and get a “free walk” back to their side.

 



VARIATIONS
Try these variations!

  • Use two barrels per side instead of one.
  • Have students toss the balls or do an underhand volleyball serve instead of throwing them into the barrel.



WORDS OF WISDOM

  • Switch the defenders after every 2-minute round.
  • Remind your students to “pay attention” as the title of this game implies.
  • Try asking your students how they can make the game easier, harder, or different after each round as well. This is a strategy we often use with our students on a daily basis and it works!
  • Instead of trying to get more balls in the barrel than your opponent, we always emphasize trying to get at least one more ball in the barrel than in the previous round.

 

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